Job seekers share subtle interview red flags that show you shouldn’t work there

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When it comes to job interviews, there can be a lot of pressure and if the nerves get the better of you, it could be easy to miss subtle red flags that the position isn’t quite what you’re after.

While the interviewer is gathering information about you as a potential candidate during the session, it’s equally important for you to be watching out for what they might be like as an employer.

But what warning signs should you be looking out for that you shouldn’t work somewhere?

A job seeker recently took to Reddit to ask fellow users what subtle red flags they had spotted during interviews that made them walk away from a job.

One person shared the story of a rude manager who didn’t even show up for the interview.

They said: “I once showed up for an interview and the manager wasn’t there that day. No one called me to let me know.

“The assistant manager was not apologetic for the scheduling issue at all. She was literally just like ‘oh, she’s not here today’ in a tone that suggested I should somehow already know that. She said they would call me to reschedule some time the next week. I told her I was currently unavailable M-W but could come in any time Th-F.

“She said if I couldn’t make time for the interview, I probably wouldn’t be a good fit. I said okay, and went on to my other interviews and ending up working elsewhere.

“You’d think that would be the end of it, but both the manager and the assistant manager badmouthed me to a few other people in the industry, including one of my friends.

“Hello? I made time for an interview. You disrespected me by not calling me to let me know it was cancelled. I gave you the times I was available to reschedule, and that was disrespectful somehow?”

Someone else told how they were asked to give up their free time and work on weekends unpaid.

“Once an interviewer straight up asked me if I had any trouble working for free on weekends… I told them my free time is more valuable than anything and that the only way that I would work a weekend is if they are paying me and if I felt like working a weekend. She got really mad at me and ended the interview right away.”

A different Reddit user urged people to ask about staff turnover.

They wrote: “If they’re always hiring.

“Constant staff turnover means people quit a lot, so it must be bad.”

Another person replied: “When you ask, ‘what do you like about working here’ and the interviewer talks about the location of the job (‘it’s a great place to live!’) instead of the actual job.”

A fifth person commented: “Always ask the interviewer about the last person who worked the position you are interviewing for, how long they worked, and why they left. Their answers can be very telling of the work environment.”